Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board

Here are a couple of pictures of a recent Sinking Valley Woodworks project: a Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board.

It’s solid end-grain, glued up with Titebond Ultimate, and sanded down to 2000 grit.  It simply has mineral oil – the gloss is from the wood itself.

What do you think?

Here is the finished product.

Closeup of Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board

Notice how glossy the top is?  That’s what happens when you take Brazilian Cherry end grain to 2000 sanding.

Side View of Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board

The swirls in the grain pattern were intentional.  As the pieces were glued up, the grain was alternated creating a very neat final pattern.

Top View of Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board

Here is a closeup of the grain.

Closeup of Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board Grain

This is prior to any mineral oil being applied.  Notice the reflection of the light that is 9′ above the surface.

Pre Finished Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board

I-Beam clamps.  They are great.

Glue up of Brazilian Cherry Butcher Block Cutting Board

Old hand forged nails

We have some old hand forged nails. The nails were made by a blacksmith.

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We polished them with a Dremel tool using a wire brush.  Did you know that a Dremel tool can spin 500 times per second?  Wow.  We wore safety glasses to protect our eyes.

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Here is a polished nail.

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Here are some facts on old nails.

  • Old nails were once so valuable that when a building burnt or fell down people went through with magnets to find the nails and save them.
  • Nails provide one of the best clues to help determine the age of historic buildings, especially those constructed during the nineteenth century.
  • Between the 1790s and the early 1800s, various machines were invented in the United States for making nails from bars of iron.

 

Here is the a chart for nails. (Copyright Thomas Visser)

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You can read more about it here: http://www.uvm.edu/histpres/203/nails.html

That is all for now!

 

References:

 

 

 

Cleaning our South Bend Model A Lathe

Cleaning our South Bend Model A Lathe

Our South Bend Model A Lathe was rather stiff when we started working with it but we have been cleaning it up a lot since then.  Now it is running very smoothly by hand – we still do not have it under power yet.

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WD-40 has been a great cleaning agent.  It cuts through old dried up oil really well.   There was a slight bit of rust on the ways, so we used some steel wool and very fine-grit  sandpaper (400 grit) to clean them up.

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Basically it boils down to a lot of time and “elbow grease”.  Thanks to Ezra, it is looking a lot nicer now.

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That is all for now!