MakerBot Replicator 2 – Arduino Bumper

I was using a piece of foam rubber under my Arduino for the Marble Roller project.  Not so nice, right?

Having a brand new MakerBot Replicator 2 on my desk, I decided to, well, make a nice bumper (or 3).

No design time needed as someone else did the hard work: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:26237

Printed out wonderfully.  Fits perfectly.

IMG_2375

IMG_2376

Arduino Marble Roller #2

Here is an update to the marble roller project.  We are using foam board and hot glue for construction.  This is a surprisingly strong construction method for prototyping and projects like this.

In the foreground is a new stepper motor.  Not sure if we will be using it or not for this project yet.

Marble Roller

Arduino Bipolar Stepper Circuit

I got a cool little 4-wire bipolar stepper motor and wanted to drive it via Arduino.

I based the design on this reference: 

http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/StepperBipolarCircuit (credit for following image belongs there as well)

 

 

bipolar_stepper_four_pins

Here is how it looks for real.  Kind of a mess of wires, but you know what?  It works great.

IMG_2031

 

 

 

Arduino, Transistors, Motors, and LEDs

Well, the fun is increasing with Arduino.  We hooked up some circuitry which enables a transistor to switch a fairly large 12V load via a very small 5V digital pin on the Arduino board.

This has been a great learning resource: http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/trancirc.htm

Basically, we have 12V power going through a motor circuit (protected by a signal diode), and then to the collector of a transistor.  The emitter of the transister is connected to ground.

Lastly, the Arduino ground is joined with the emitter, and the transistor is switched by a 5V digital output pin on the Arduino board.

Now, just need to find something useful to do!

 

Fun with Arduino

Ok, so if you haven’t heard about it, Arduino is a really cool piece of “open source hardware”.  In simple terms, it is a single board computer with a number of analog and digital inputs and outputs, that can be programmed from your computer, but run independently.

Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for artists, designers, hobbyists, and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments.

I recently got this starter kit from Amazon.com:

And have since been playing with making different circuits, etc… It has been a good experience in working with lower level electronics (ohm’s law, etc…)

Hope to post more soon!