2D Sine Wave Example Using PyOpenGL

Here is an example of a moving 2D sine wave using Python 3, PyGame, and PyOpenGL.  See a https://blog.gahooa.com/2018/02/11/pygame-and-opengl-on-windows-10/  for how to install them.

sine

This sample program is designed to have a 100×60 unit working area with a 10 unit buffer around the edges.  You can see the axis in the lower-left (0,0) where Y+ is up, and X+ is to the right.

The structure of the program was created to make it super easy to work on the “guts” of the graphics without getting it confused with the “bookkeeping” end of OpenGL or PyGame.

Note: the glOrtho() command is how 2D “parallel perspective” is setup.  It defines the left, right, bottom, top, near plane, and far plane.  Because it is parallel, there is not the notion of a “camera” per-se, but rather section of the plane that should be viewed.  Documented here:

https://www.khronos.org/registry/OpenGL-Refpages/gl2.1/xhtml/glOrtho.xml

Here is the code!

PyGame and OpenGL on Windows 10

First I went to http://www.python.org and downloaded the latest version of Python for windows.  I made sure to select the option to add it to the system path.

Then I opened windows PowerShell (just a nicer term)

py -m pip install pygame --user
py -m pip install numpy --user
py -m pip install pyopengl --user

(I also installed NoteTab++, a nice text editor)

From there, I went to github and copied one of the examples from https://github.com/pygame/pygame/blob/master/examples/glcube.py and saved it on my desktop as myglcube.py.

In PowerShell, you just type:

cd Desktop
py -m myglcube

Here is my example:

zzz

(here is the code)